Unlearning the myth of American innocence

When she was 30, Suzy Hansen left the US for Istanbul – and began to realise that Americans will never understand their own country until they see it as the rest of the world does

My mother recently found piles of my notebooks from when I was a small child that were filled with plans for my future. I was very ambitious. I wrote out what I would do at every age: when I would get married and when I would have kids and when I would open a dance studio.

When I left my small hometown for college, this sort of planning stopped. The experience of going to a radically new place, as college was to me, upended my sense of the world and its possibilities. The same thing happened when I moved to New York after college, and a few years later when I moved to Istanbul. All change is dramatic for provincial people. But the last move was the hardest. In Turkey, the upheaval was far more unsettling: after a while, I began to feel that the entire foundation of my consciousness was a lie.

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Landlord troubles: rich San Franciscans in uproar after their private street is sold

Residents of one of the city’s most exclusive neighborhoods got a surprise taste of its infamous housing woes after their private road was sold at auction

For most San Franciscans accustomed to being at the whims of speculators in a soaring real estate market, the arrival of a new landlord is a near-certain harbinger of bad news.

But the residents of Presidio Terrace are not most San Franciscans, and it’s highly unlikely that they’ll be crafting desperate Facebook messages seeking an affordable room to rent in Oakland (dog friendly pleeeeease), making plans to move to Los Angeles or living in a box.

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Secretive search for man behind Trump dossier reveals tension in Russia inquiry

Attempt by two congressional staffers to contact former M16 officer highlights fight for control over House intelligence committee’s investigation

Two US congressional staffers who travelled to London in July and tried to contact former British intelligence officer Christopher Steele, were sent by a longstanding aide to Devin Nunes, the chairman of the House intelligence committee and a close ally of the White House.

The trip has brought back to the surface a continuing struggle for control of the committee’s investigation into Moscow’s role in the 2016 US election. The reliability of a dossier compiled by Steele, containing explosive allegations of extensive secret collusion between Trump and the Kremlin, is a key part of that investigation.

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