Taxpayers to foot a legal bill for Michaelia Cash’s union raid court case

The attorney general has confirmed funds have been approved to respond to the court subpoenas the MP labelled a ‘Labor and union stunt’

Taxpayers will foot the legal bill for jobs minister Michaelia Cash’s response to federal court subpoenas seeking documents relating to the police raid on the Australian Workers Union.

A regulation signed by the attorney general Christian Porter, released on Tuesday, confirmed he had approved taxpayer funding of Cash’s costs because they related to her former role as employment minister.

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Labor confirms it will oppose ‘irresponsible’ 10-year tax package

Bill Shorten says Labor will support tax relief for low and middle income workers but ‘no responsible’ opposition would vote for the whole package

Labor has thrown down the political gauntlet on the Turnbull government’s income tax cuts, confirming it will only support stage one – the tax relief for low and middle income earners – as the package sits on a knife’s edge.

As foreshadowed by the shadow treasurer Chris Bowen on Monday, Labor has resolved to oppose stage two and three of the income tax cuts package outlined by the Turnbull government on May 7 – setting up a clash on the competing economic plans both at the July byelections and at the federal election this year or next.

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Labor confirms it will oppose ‘irresponsible’ 10-year tax package

Bill Shorten says Labor will support tax relief for low and middle income workers but ‘no responsible’ opposition would vote for the whole package

Labor has thrown down the political gauntlet on the Turnbull government’s income tax cuts, confirming it will only support stage one – the tax relief for low and middle income earners – as the package sits on a knife’s edge.

As foreshadowed by the shadow treasurer Chris Bowen on Monday, Labor has resolved to oppose stage two and three of the income tax cuts package outlined by the Turnbull government on May 7 – setting up a clash on the competing economic plans both at the July byelections and at the federal election this year or next.

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Refugee children’s story turned into a heartwarming claymation video

Ali and the Long Journey to Australia draws on the experiences of 13 classmates from seven countries

“We’ve had kids in the past who have been boy soldiers, [forced] into the military as young as 11 or 12,” says David Rothstadt, the principal of Noble Park primary school in Victoria.

“We’ve had students who have lost family members, and been witness to it. We’ve had kids who have come by boat, their lives in danger. People don’t come by boat lightly.”

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Australians don’t want ABC used as a ‘punching bag’, Michelle Guthrie says

The managing director has strongly defended the ABC and warned against hobbling it to create a ‘market failure organisation’

Australians do not like seeing the ABC being used as a “punching bag” by narrow political, commercial or ideological interests, its managing director Michelle Guthrie has said in forceful defence of the public broadcaster.

“As a nation, we could choose not to have the ABC; or we could hobble it so that it becomes the market failure organisation it was never intended to be,” Guthrie told the Melbourne Press Club on Tuesday.

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Does gender-flipping The Rape of Lucretia fix it for the #MeToo age? | Brigid Delaney

In a week of violence against women headlines, I’m unsettled about Britten’s opera – but maybe that’s its point

Of all the performances designed to shock or confront at this year’s Dark Mofo, so far it’s a mid-20th century British opera, The Rape of Lucretia, that has been the most unsettling to watch – despite the effort made by this production to recraft it for the modern age.

The story begins with men away at war who have heard rumours of their wives sleeping around. One man, Tarquinius, resolves to rape the only wife who has been faithful – Lucretia – to prove that every woman is a whore deep down.

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Dreamworld inquest: emergency stop button was not pushed

Police investigator says injuries on Thunder River Rapids ride could have been ‘limited’ if a nearby emergency stop panel had been used

No one pushed an emergency stop button that might have saved the lives of the four people who died on a Dreamworld ride in October 2016, a Queensland inquest has heard.

Cindy Low, Kate Goodchild, her brother Luke Dorsett and his partner Roozi Araghi died instantly after being thrown from a raft when the Thunder River Rapids ride malfunctioned in October 2016.

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